The Massage Company: massaging the masses

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

It’s official – construction has never had it so good

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Opportunity continues to beckon in Russia

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

Wind power project on top of the world

first_imgScheuerle heavyweight transport equipment has been used to deliver the first item in the consignment: a 130 tonne windmill nacelle. Four nacelles will ultimately be transported from Loviisa, Finland to Uljaboda, Sweden by barge from Loviisa to Skelleftea and from there by road to Uljaboda where the Arctic Wind Project is being installed.Each windmill requires 45m 12 piece blades from Poland. These were shipped to Skelleftea and from there also by road to Uljaboda. The journey from Skelleftra to the site measured 300km.The headline difficulty of this transport was the hill climb to the top of the mountain; the climb was five kilometres in length and rose 330m, with the steepest segment rising at an inclination of 14 percent. The transport combination consisted of a 4-axle towing truck and 13 axle lines of Scheuerle InterCombi had to be supported by a large dumper truck in order to manage the climb.The three other nacelles will be transported by Silvasti Logistics in the immediate future to complete the contract.last_img read more

Port of Tyne granted AEO status

first_imgAEO status is an internationally recognised quality mark, awarded by HMRC, which means that the port’s Customs checks and processes meet international standards, giving the UK gateway faster access to simplified Customs procedures.According to the port, it is one of only a handful of UK gateways to be awarded full AEO status for both Customs simplification and fast track security and safety processes.“The award of AEO status means that the port of Tyne will be fully prepared whatever the outcome of the ongoing Brexit negotiations,” said the UK port’s ceo Matt Beeton. “Our customers will know that we’re a safe and secure business partner and that we’ll have streamlined arrangements in place to move goods across international borders quickly and easily.”Graeme Hardie, head of operations at the port of Tyne, added that the status “will, potentially, avoid delays, creating greater efficiencies, and will ensure goods are imported and exported as swiftly and securely as possible”.www.portoftyne.co.uklast_img read more

Omaha residents report seeing murder hornets, expert says not to worry

first_img Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. OMAHA, NEBRASKA (CNN) Omaha residents report seeing murder hornets, expert says not to worry Recommended Invasive ‘murder hornet’ spotted in US for first time SHARE Published: July 12, 2020 7:30 PM EDT Omaha residents have reported seeing giant bugs in the metro area recently, worried they could be murder hornets — properly known as Asian Giant Hornets. 6 News’ Lileana Pearson looked into it.First, the good news — while huge and buzzing around my ankles, these bugs are not murder hornets.There have been no reports of murder hornets in Nebraska at all.What you are seeing is a cicada killer wasp. These inch to inch-and-a-half wasps live in the ground and spend the day hunting cicadas.They live in holes they dig in the ground and are too busy to bother people, so if you see them around they won’t sting you.What you’re most likely seeing in your yard are the males who are waiting around on the female to come back to the dens.Nebraska Extension Office Entomologist Jody Green says these insects are native to Nebraska and natural to see around.“They are native. They’re pretty widespread. We got them all over the east coast and we have seen more and more of them in the last year, but every time a female leaves a bunch of cicadas underground with eggs they’re pretty much going to come back the following year,” she said. Author: By Lileana Pearson / WOWT Ex-Omaha weatherman accused of targeting health director last_img read more

Ten reasons not to go on holiday

first_imgYou can work on indemnity insurance proposal forms that are being sent daily by email, post, dx and by hand. Or alternatively use them to redecorate your office. You may miss your best-ever case and your only chance to make legal history. Or you may simply lose out on work. Of course, there may be someone in the office, but if you are not there personally cases may go to a rival. The office might burn down the moment you go away; although it has never done that so far. Your partners and staff may run away the moment you leave, although normally they all seem happy you are going away, even if only for a few days. (Query: is that good or bad?) You will not have to dictate holiday notes that everyone insists on and no one ever reads until you get back. Holiday notes are a well-loved tradition and best given to your secretary to type up on the Friday afternoon before you leave. All the dissatisfied clients you ever had may launch a class action against you, the moment they see you at the foreign exchange till or buying suntan lotion in the supermarket. You might meet other lawyers on holiday, all complaining about legal aid, the courts service, and clients. Stress and tension, irritability and short-temperedness is good for staff morale. You will not have to pack. Or spend time relaxing, enjoying yourself. You will not have to buy a box of overpriced ginger biscuits in the airport as you leave to go home. (I do not know why they are ginger, but they always taste the same wherever you buy them, even though someone has glued a local postcard on the box. They are probably all made in Birmingham.) Happy Holidays!last_img read more

Desperate brokers unload PII books without scrutiny

first_imgWith deadlines looming to renew professional indemnity insurance, desperate brokers are offering insurers books of hundreds of law firms without any scrutiny of their ability to pay out on claims, an insurer has claimed.In an interview with the Gazette, Jason Smart, chief executive of indemnity insurer Elite, lifted the lid on the lengths brokers will go to get insurance arranged for firms. The solicitors’ PII renewal deadline is set to pass at midnight tonight with potentially hundreds of firms still seeking cover. Many will come from the group of 1,300 left without an insurer after they separated from insurers Balva and then Berliner in the past year.Smart said his firm was approached to take on the book of firms en masse – an approach that was immediately refused. ‘We have offered terms to the better risks but we have been very careful not to be the recipient of a bin full of application that were part of a ludicrous situation.‘Berliner was not big enough and the premiums were completely untenable. We were very vocal and resistant to being a dumping ground for everybody else’s mistakes.’Smart said that ‘several’ brokers had tried to push the Berliner book onto his firm, even though it amounted to more than double the £8m Elite was prepared to write in the legal market this year.‘This all stems down to the broker market – they should be less worried about their 25% commission and more worried about selling a product that has some value,’ he said. ‘I even had a text message from somebody I don’t know asking me to take on a £20m book. I don’t think there would have been any scrutiny had we expressed an interest. The broker should look at the financials of the business and how they will meet liabilities.’Smart emphasised that his criticism did not apply to all brokers, several of which are showing due diligence in assessing whether a law firm and insurer was a correct match.Firms that have missed out on securing cover now enter the Extended Indmenity Period, a 30-day period in which a firm can continue to practise and try to obtain qualifying insurance.Several rated and unrated insurers are believed to be still prepared to accept applications from firms in this situation.Smart said the grace period during October, when firms can still practise while they search for an insurer, will be ‘incredibly busy’. In some cases firms will have to accept paying premiums up to 15% of their annual fee income as insurers set prices based on risk created by other firms.last_img read more

Lawyer wins review of DWP delays

first_imgThe Department for Work and Pensions has promised to review how it handles possible benefits overpayments into estates following a complaint by a solicitor.Terry Moore (pictured), a partner at Hull firm Burstalls and chair of the Hull Probate Practitioners group, told the Gazette that he hoped the review would benefit most estates in England and Wales.The review was promised after Moore complained to the DWP when an investigation into his 89-year-old client’s estate caused ‘great delay’.Moore said that while such an investigation should take roughly three months, this enquiry took almost a year, with the DWP’s lawyers posing questions that were impossible to answer.According to Moore, the DWP asked for bank statements from 2003, despite the fact that most banks do not keep records for more than six years.He said the department caused ‘great delay and distress’ to the executors and beneficiaries of the estate as the administration of the assets and liabilities could not be completed until the outcome of the enquiries was known.He added: ‘The department’s repeated inappropriate, impractical and misinformed enquiry set off a merry-go-round of correspondence without any practical value.’Following an intervention by Moore’s MP, the DWP apologised for the delay and said that it would review processes, including how far back it requires bank statements, and implement any improvements as soon as possible.A spokesperson from the DWP said that while it tries to identify possible benefit overpayments as ‘quickly and as sensitively as possible’ these can often be complex cases requiring timely information from executors and solicitors.The spokesperson added: ‘We are committed to continuously improving the service we provide and as part of our review we welcome feedback from the legal profession so we can ensure the process is as effective as possible.’last_img read more

The Caribbean prepares for 2018 Atlantic hurricane season

first_imgCredit: NOAA The 2018 Atlantic Hurricane season began on Friday with the Barbados-based Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) urging regional countries to undertake all necessary measures to ensure safety to their populations. Scientists reviews forecastTop scientists with the Colorado State University say the season may not be as dangerous as earlier predicted and that a near-average season is likely, with 14 named storms, of which six could become hurricanes. A tropical storm becomes a hurricane when its wind speed reaches 74 miles per hour (mph).The scientists said the reason for the revised predictions is that seawater in the eastern Atlantic Ocean is unusually cold for this time of year. Moreover, a weak El Niño could also form later in the year, which tends to suppress Atlantic hurricane development.Preparations urged nonethelessBut CDEMA executive director, Ronald Jackson, speaking at a news conference, said regional countries, particularly those that were several impacted by Hurricanes Irma and Maria when they passed through the Lesser Antilles last September, should take all necessary precautions to save life and limb.All hazards approachHe said CDEMA and other stakeholders had staged an event late last month “sharpening our capacities for dealing with disaster issues,” acknowledging that “there’s work to be done. “The key messages that I think we need to take away from our readiness for the hurricane season is that CDEMA promotes an all hazards approach and so our efforts towards readiness is not focused only on the hurricane season but across the entire hazard spectrum that affects the Caribbean region.“We want our member states and citizens to be able to recognize that we are exposed not only to hurricanes…but there are a number of other challenges and threats that we are grappling with as a region.”Jackson said it was necessary for the region to continue to strengthen its capacity to deal with such disasters, adding “we remain very confident in the regional response mechanism as vehicle for providing coordination support to member states”.He said it has been tried tested and proven “and it has been hailed as a piece of innovation, not only in the Caribbean but across the globe and we have confidence in it and its partners at the regional level.”last_img read more