Children’s cancer research is often ignored. Make it a ‘moonshot’ priority

first_imgFirst OpinionChildren’s cancer research is often ignored. Make it a ‘moonshot’ priority Related: By David A. Williams April 14, 2016 Reprints About the Author Reprints Since then, overall cure rates for childhood cancers have risen to 80 percent. Some pediatric cancers post cure rates of 90 percent, while others remain difficult or nearly impossible to cure. At the same time, a majority of childhood cancer survivors experience harmful, lifelong complications of the treatments that saved them. Such late effects can be far more devastating to the survivor diagnosed at age 5 than the survivor diagnosed at age 65.Focus on childrenWe are learning that cancer research is a two-way street. Just as breakthroughs in adult cancer research can help children, breakthroughs in pediatric cancer can also benefit adults.advertisement The leading edge of cancer research and treatment is toppling two old silos: cancer’s location in the body and patient age. A targeted therapy aimed at adult skin cancer is also helping children with brain tumors who share the same mutation. And research into the relatively pristine genomic landscape of pediatric cancers — children have accumulated far fewer genetic mutations than adults — is providing new insights into childhood cancers that may also translate into advances for adults.The path forward, as noted in the coalition’s Recommended Pediatric Priorities for the Cancer Moonshot Initiative, contains several challenges. The biology and types of childhood cancers differ from those that affect adults and require distinct investigation and therapies. A young cancer patient stands in her bed at Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago. Christian K. Lee/AP @childcancercare Related: Obama administration wants $1 billion to jumpstart Joe Biden’s cancer ‘moonshot’ Panel of experts named to advise Biden on cancer ‘moonshot’ Although there are more than 150 types of childhood cancer, pediatric cancer receives only a small fraction of National Cancer Institute and National Institutes of Health funding. Research and development of new therapies largely depend on federal and philanthropic resources because industry is focusing its oncology efforts on the vastly larger potential market for adult cancer drugs.The coalition believes that these four areas should be part of the moonshot’s pediatric agenda:Gene activity. Genetic abnormalities seen in pediatric cancers often involve the regulation of gene activity — instructions that tell genes to turn on or off. Such abnormalities are also important in a wide range of adult cancers. Deviations in gene regulation are currently difficult to treat with drugs. We need to develop novel avenues of research to accelerate the journey from bench to bedside of drugs aimed at gene regulation.Gene-targeted therapy. In the clinical revolution called precision medicine, childhood cancers have lagged behind adult cancers. Recent research suggests that children could benefit from more extensive genetic sequencing of their cancers. The National Cancer Institute, which is already investigating precision medicine for adult cancers, is expected to open a pediatric Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (MATCH) trial later this year. This and other studies into applications of genetically targeted therapies for pediatric cancers will push forward this promising approach.Federal efforts. The federal government can play a critical role by requiring and encouraging pharmaceutical companies to develop drugs for children with cancer. Recently enacted incentives that extend patent periods or speed the approval process for drug applications are important steps in this direction. The federal government needs to ensure that clinical trials in children are started earlier in the drug approval process. It should also make sure that guidelines for pediatric dosing are created for potentially beneficial drugs, and that new drugs are made in the liquid formulation needed for young children who can’t swallow pills.Collaborative efforts. Because childhood cancer is less common than adult cancer, progress is possible only with collaboration across institutions. The National Pediatric Research Network, which was recently approved by Congress, is an important new tool. It should be funded and implemented without further delay.The decades of productive life awaiting boys and girls cured of cancer should be reward enough for ensuring that children have a place in the cancer moonshot. The promise of years ahead, too, for older individuals cured of cancer makes finding room for pediatric cancer in the moonshot that much more critical.David A. Williams, MD, is president of the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. Cancer is the leading disease-related cause of death in children in the United States. Yet pediatric cancer is often left behind when it comes to funding research and developing new drugs. Not only does this give short shrift to children with cancer, but it also threatens to rob us of advances that could benefit cancer patients of all ages.That’s what I and fellow members of the Coalition for Pediatric Medical Research told the staff of Vice President Joe Biden, who is leading the cancer “moonshot.” We recently met in Biden’s Washington office to make the case that childhood cancer must be represented as the government considers ways to propel cancer research.Six decades ago, the first major breakthrough in the treatment of cancer came when Dr. Sidney Farber used an experimental drug to treat leukemia in children. Some went into remission — a medical first. Chemotherapy was born, revolutionizing the care of both children and adults with cancer.advertisement David A. Williams Tags cancerchildrenmoonshotlast_img read more

FDA proposal on health software provides no clarity on artificial intelligence

first_imgHealth FDA proposal on health software provides no clarity on artificial intelligence About the Authors Reprints Casey Ross @caseymross By Casey Ross and Ike Swetlitz Dec. 8, 2017 Reprints Mike Groll/AP Unlock this article — and get additional analysis of the technologies disrupting health care — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED National Technology Correspondent Casey covers the use of artificial intelligence in medicine and its underlying questions of safety, fairness, and privacy. He is the co-author of the newsletter STAT Health Tech. What’s included?center_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. The Food and Drug Administration proposed on Thursday to streamline its regulation of health software tools, but remained largely silent on the crucial question of how it will treat products that rely on artificial intelligence, experts said.The agency’s draft guidance on so-called clinical decision support tools is a long-awaited attempt to define the rules in a regulatory gray area where many new products are promising to change the delivery of medicine. The experts said the document appears to broadly grant latitude to developers of software that helps doctors diagnose and treat a range of conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. Log In | Learn More Tags medical technologypolicy STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. [email protected] What is it? GET STARTEDlast_img read more

System for reporting suspicious opioid orders repeatedly failed, report finds

first_img @levfacher What’s included? Tags Congressopioids About the Author Reprints GET STARTED Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Log In | Learn More What is it? System for reporting suspicious opioid orders repeatedly failed, report finds Politics center_img Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) Win McNamee/Getty Images [email protected] Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Lev Facher Washington Correspondent Lev Facher covers the politics of health and life sciences. By Lev Facher July 12, 2018 Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. WASHINGTON — A Senate report released Thursday lays out systematic failures in the reporting system for suspicious opioid orders, faulting some drug distributors and manufacturers for their roles and criticizing the Drug Enforcement Administration for a years-long lull in enforcement actions.The findings, the latest in a series of reports from Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), the top Democrat on the Senate’s leading oversight committee, pointed in particular to disparities between two leading drug distributors: McKesson and AmerisourceBergen.last_img read more

Promising study results thrust Viking Therapeutics into race for lucrative fatty liver disease treatment

first_img An experimental pill from Viking Therapeutics (VKTX) reduced liver fat in patients with early signs of fatty liver disease, according to results from a mid-stage clinical trial announced Tuesday.The promising clinical trial results thrust Viking into the mix of companies racing to develop new treatments for NASH, the commonly used acronym for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, a chronic disease in which fat accumulates in the liver. GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Tags biotechdrug developmentSTAT+ What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. [email protected] Biotech Senior Writer, Biotech Adam is STAT’s national biotech columnist, reporting on the intersection of biotech and Wall Street. He’s also a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. @adamfeuerstein center_img Promising study results thrust Viking Therapeutics into race for lucrative fatty liver disease treatment Adobe Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED By Adam Feuerstein Sept. 18, 2018 Reprints Log In | Learn More About the Author Reprints What’s included? Adam Feuersteinlast_img read more

NIH hospital’s pipes harbored uncommon bacteria that infected patients

first_imgHealth What’s included? GET STARTED By Ike Swetlitz Dec. 26, 2018 Reprints NIH hospital’s pipes harbored uncommon bacteria that infected patients NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. NIH Log In | Learn More Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Patients were infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria living in the plumbing of the National Institutes of Health’s hospital in Bethesda, Md., contributing to at least three deaths in 2016.A study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine found that, from 2006 to 2016, at least 12 patients at the NIH Clinical Center, which provides experimental therapies and hosts research trials, were infected with Sphingomonas koreensis, an uncommon bacteria. The paper, written by NIH researchers, suggests that the infections came from contaminated water pipes, where the bacteria may have been living since as early as 2004, soon after construction of a new clinical center building. Tags government agencieshospitalsinfectious diseaselast_img read more

Acadia Pharmaceuticals buys pain drug maker, part of effort to expand on psychosis treatment

first_imgBiotech GET STARTED [email protected] About the Author Reprints Acadia Pharmaceuticals is purchasing a small Texas startup, CerSci, for $52 million in order to acquire a pain drug in the early stages of development, the company said Tuesday.If the drug succeeds, CerSci could receive an additional $887 million in payments for hitting commercial and development milestones. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. By Matthew Herper Aug. 25, 2020 Reprints Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Tags biotechnologySTAT+center_img GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images Log In | Learn More Matthew Herper What is it? Senior Writer, Medicine, Editorial Director of Events Matthew covers medical innovation — both its promise and its perils. Acadia Pharmaceuticals buys pain drug maker, part of effort to expand on psychosis treatment What’s included? @matthewherper last_img read more

Janet Woodcock revolutionized the way the FDA reviews cancer drugs, inspiring her supporters and raising concerns for detractors

first_img What is it? [email protected] Janet Woodcock Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/AP @NicholasFlorko Tags cancergovernment agenciespolicySTAT+White House Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Log In | Learn More Nicholas Florko By Nicholas Florko March 1, 2021 Reprints Politics center_img WASHINGTON — In 2000, the Food and Drug Administration approved just three cancer drugs. Last year, even with the agency laser-focused on the coronavirus pandemic, much of its staff teleworking, the agency still approved a record-breaking 17 different cancer therapies — more than in any other category.That’s the legacy of FDA drug center chief Janet Woodcock. Washington Correspondent Nicholas Florko reports on the the intersection of politics and health policy. He is the author the newsletter “D.C. Diagnosis.” About the Author Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. GET STARTED What’s included? Janet Woodcock revolutionized the way the FDA reviews cancer drugs, inspiring her supporters and raising concerns for detractors Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr.last_img read more

WATCH LIVE: President-elect Joe Biden introduces key foreign policy & national security nominees

first_imgAdvertisementTags: Joe Biden AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Florida minimum wage could increase to $15 even sooner once Biden takes office January 19, 2021 Here’s a schedule of the 2021 Presidential Inauguration Day events January 20, 2021 Advertisement Security increases around the state in preparation for the Biden Inauguration January 20, 2021 RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Advertisement President-elect Joe Biden is scheduled to speak at 1 p.m. from Wilmington, DE., to introduce key foreign policy and national security nominees.WATCH LIVE: WATCH LIVE: 2021 Presidential Inauguration Day Coverage January 20, 2021last_img read more

Father of kids killed in Cape canal crash wanted in Michigan

first_imgAdvertisementTags: Cape Coralcrashmichigan LEE COUNTY, Fla. – The father involved in a deadly Cape Coral canal crash is wanted in Michigan on 14 felony charges, according to Chief Michael Veach at Mt. Morris Township Police Department.Kenneth Wayne Lawson is wanted for domestic violence, assault, and weapons offenses. Court documents show the charges stem from a June 2020 incident. The night before Thanksgiving, Lawson was involved in a crash where a car became submerged in a canal. Two of his sons were in the car, 7-year-old Titus Lawson and 10-year-old John Lawson. Titus was pronounced dead at the scene of the crash and John later died in the hospital from his injuries.The car was driving eastbound on NE 31st Street approaching the intersection of NE 5th Place, then drove through an empty lot, hit a canal bank, went airborne, then ended up in the canal. Cape Coral canal levels remain low even after recent rains June 17, 2021 Advertisement RELATEDTOPICS 27 Cape Coral bridges up for repairs after minor cracks found June 17, 2021 Lawson and Julia Drudy were in the car when it crashed but police have not said who was driving. Drudy told NBC2 she kicked out the windshield to get out of the car and was not driving. She claimed she wanted to go to police, but Lawson stopped her, stating he didn’t want to go to jail.Lawson’s family said he was not driving the car. Investigators confirmed drugs and/or alcohol are factors of the crash. Advertisement Cape Coral police said they can not arrest Lawson based on the warrant out of Michigan, stating it is not extraditable. Cape Coral break in foiled by barking dog June 17, 2021 Driver slams parked cars into Lehigh Acres home June 17, 2021 Advertisement AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments No arrests have been made for the deadly canal crash case. AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 commentslast_img read more

Man who plotted to eat children asks for prison release due to coronavirus risk

first_imgRELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementChild pornography was reportedly found on Portway’s computer, reported WFLA. He had built a dungeon with torture devices in his basement for the purpose of raping, torturing, murdering and cannabalizing young children, authorities said. He was sentenced to almost 27 years in prison after pleading guilty to solicitation of child kidnapping and charges of possession and distribution of child pornography.Portway is being held in a federal prison in Virginia. Advertisement A former Massachusetts resident who built a dungeon in his home and plotted to torture and eat children has requested to be released from prison because he is at high risk of contracting the coronavirus.Geoffrey Portway filed a motion for compassionate release, according to NBC affiliate WFLA, citing more than 40 cases of coronavirus in his prison. Portway claimed he was at higher risk of contracting coronavirus because he is obese and asked to be sent back to England, where he is from.In 2012, Portway was one of 60 people arrested in a far-reaching international child pornography probe. During the operation, authorities said 167 children were identified as victims and rescued. New toothpaste tube lined with slippery coating to let you use every last drop April 30, 2021 AdvertisementTags: cannabalismCoronavirusMassachusetts NBC2 Anchor Kellie Burns shares her experience getting the COVID-19 vaccine March 24, 2021center_img Pregnancy & COVID-19: New study shows increased risk of negative outcomes April 24, 2021 Advertisement AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments More scientists think COVID-19 spreads primarily through the air April 24, 2021 AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 commentslast_img read more